National 14.8.2016 09:56 am

ANC admits it ‘lost sight of its own values’

Then presidential favourite Jacob Zuma (L) helps former South African president Nelson Mandela at the end of an African National Congress (ANC) election rally in Johannesburg on April 19, 2009. Picture: AFP

Then presidential favourite Jacob Zuma (L) helps former South African president Nelson Mandela at the end of an African National Congress (ANC) election rally in Johannesburg on April 19, 2009. Picture: AFP

The ruling party has been warned that its loss of power in Gauteng was partly due to the fact the DA was able to claim the moral high ground.

The Sunday Independent has reported that it has seen a committee report tabled at the ANC’s national executive committee (NEC) meeting in Irene, Gauteng, which has laid some of the blame for the ANC’s “disastrous” poll results in August 3 elections on the fact that the party has, among many things, lost touch with its earlier core values of nonracialism and nonsexism.

It also claims the party is being consumed by “factionalism and the arrogance of power” and has “lost touch with ordinary people”.

Among warnings made at the NEC gathering was that if the elections had been a provincial vote, the ANC would have needed a coalition partner or partners to retain governance of the Gauteng province, since the overall vote for the party slipped below 50% last week Wednesday.

The report revealed huge concerns that the ruling party is losing its grip on all the major economic centres, which the DA is winning by “usurping aspects of our legacy”. This was a reference to how the DA laid claim to former president Nelson Mandela, who preached nonracism, while President Jacob Zuma, in his campaign, went on a highly spirited, and some argued racist, campaign asking black voters to unite against white voters and calling the DA “snakes” and the offspring of the racist National Party.

Meanwhile, City Press has reported that the ANC’s top six leaders tried to keep the findings of its own internal research report away from the party faithful out of fear that members would become demoralised. A year before the polls, its report warned that the ANC was losing support and the DA was growing stronger. It recommended dealing with “misbehaving” leaders such as Zuma and Danny Jordaan, both of whom had been consumed by scandal, the latter mainly in relation to Safa and alleged bribes paid to secure the 2010 World Cup.

It also found the party was being sabotaged from within by those unhappy with the list process.

During the NEC gathering, Zuma’s backers have reportedly tried to blame Gauteng leaders for the poor results, but City Press’ sources said it was now understood that Paul Mashatile’s provincial executive committee would not be disbanded as many previously feared might happen.

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