National 4.8.2016 09:38 pm

Midvaal ‘rejects empty ANC promises’

FILE PICTURE: Bongani Baloyi speaks to the media about his appointment as the newly elected Mayor of Midvaal at the DA offices in Newtown, Johannesburg, 30 August 2013. Picture: Tracy Lee Stark

FILE PICTURE: Bongani Baloyi speaks to the media about his appointment as the newly elected Mayor of Midvaal at the DA offices in Newtown, Johannesburg, 30 August 2013. Picture: Tracy Lee Stark

Mayoral candidate Bongani Baloyi said the retention of Midvaal by the DA was an indication of how residents had lost trust in the ruling party.

The Democratic Alliance has attributed its election victory in Midvaal to hard work. Speaking to The Citizen on Thursday, mayoral candidate Bongani Baloyi said the retention of Midvaal by the DA was an indication of how residents had lost trust and faith in the ruling party.

“With this victory, Midvaal people have rejected empty ANC promises and the violence that we saw here recently. “We, as the DA, promise residents that we will continue to work hard in ensuring that we improve people’s living conditions and also reduce the rate of unemployment … yes, we have in the past improved people’s lives but there is still more to be done,” Baloyi said.

Just before lunchtime, amid the capturing of votes countrywide, the DA led by 59.7%, followed by the ANC at 32.08%, while the EFF came third with 4.8%. Still in the Vaal region, the ANC and the DA appeared to be in a fierce contest. The ANC’s votes stood at 41.15% at about 1pm yesterday, followed by the DA with 40.97%. The EFF were occupying third spot at 9.64%.

In KwaZulu-Natal, the Inkatha Freedom Party retained its hold in President Jacob Zuma’s home of Nkandla. The party managed to get 55.79% of the votes, followed by the ANC with 42.32%, and the EFF with 0.88% .

Despite Wednesday’s icy weather and unhappiness about service delivery, residents in the Vaal region went out in their numbers to cast their votes. The Citizen took a drive through several areas which have been gripped by violent protests over lack of service delivery and unhappiness over ward councillor candidates.

Contrary to the recent violent community protests, the Sicelo informal settlement in Meyerton was calm on Wednesday as many residents were seen standing in queues to vote. Local resident Maria Motloung said she was hoping her vote would assist in bringing the much needed change in improving people’s living conditions in the area.

While driving through the Mountain View informal settlement near Ennerdale, south of Johannesburg, many residents were seen carrying buckets to fetch water from tankers.

“I hope that my vote will also go a long way in helping to improve mine and the living conditions of other residents,” said Thomas Chauke, who has been residing there for 12 years. A stone’s throw from Mountain View, in Finetown, resident Maria Mokwena said she decided to vote so that she can also have a say in how her local municipality is run.

“We have serious service delivery issues, and the main one is electricity outages … as I am speaking to you now, some of us have not had electricity for the past three weeks,” Mokwena said.

– stevent@citizen.co.za

 

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