National 4.8.2016 10:20 pm

Vote counting into final stretch, but ANC ‘files dispute’

The new national results operations centre in Pretoria, Tshwane is seen during its launch a week before elections on the 3rd of August, 27 July 2016. Picture: Jacques Nelles

The new national results operations centre in Pretoria, Tshwane is seen during its launch a week before elections on the 3rd of August, 27 July 2016. Picture: Jacques Nelles

The ANC says it won’t accept the result in Nelson Mandela Bay, though overall it continued to lead the national race, while the race for Joburg and Tshwane remained close.

With the overall count at 88% at 10.20pm on Friday, the IEC said it expected to have all results finalised by no later than noon on Friday. Ethekwini metro in particular had been lagging badly behind in the count.

Nelson Mandela Bay only had 6% of the count left, with the percentages between the DA and the ANC not shifting.

The ANC said that it was questioning and perhaps even rejecting the outcome of the vote in the Bay, and added that it had been “writing letters to the IEC” about alleged irregularities in the voting process from Monday onwards.

It confirmed that it had filed a formal dispute with the IEC about Nelson Mandela Bay results.

The (now likely former) Bay ruling party said that the IEC had not made sufficient provision for poor voters in the midst of the bad weather on voting day and it used the discovery of ballots strewn in a tent to say that perhaps ANC votes had been discarded without being counted. The IEC, however, had already dismissed this allegation.

The ANC also made vague aspersions on DA “agents” for what it appeared was an allegation of vote-rigging. However, no specifics were given, aside from repetitions that all the details were “in the letters” sent to the IEC, to which responses were apparently still being awaited.

Picture: IEC

Picture: IEC

United Democratic Movement leader Bantu Holomisa confirmed that he had already been approached by the DA to consider the possibility of a coalition in the Bay. He said that it would be best to wait for the last vote to be counted, but he said his party policy was to support whichever party appeared to best express the “trend” of whichever party voters were favouring.

Earlier

With less than 50% of the vote counted in Johannesburg, the DA and ANC remained neck and neck, while the ANC had pulled only marginally ahead in Tshwane, with 55% of the vote complete.

With more than 92% of the vote counted in Nelson Mandela Bay, the DA was still close to 50% and party leader Mmusi Maimane declared that they would end up being the biggest party, whereafter it would have to be determined which party they might need to approach to join them in a coalition, assuming they could not achieve an outright win.

Earlier

With more than 75% of the vote tallied, the winners of 106 councils had been confirmed.

The ANC won 83 by 4pm, with the DA claiming 18 and the IFP the only other party with bragging rights to councils – five of them.

Below is the IEC election briefing live from Pretoria.

Courtesy of eNCA.

Update: Here are the most recent national figures provided by the IEC, with 80% of votes counted.


 

 

 


 

latest

Figures provided by the IEC, with more than 70% of votes counted.

 

mpuma

Figures provided by the IEC, with more than 70% of votes counted.

 

Northern cape

Figures provided by the IEC, with more than 70% of votes counted.

nw

Figures provided by the IEC, with more than 70% of votes counted.

da

Figures provided by the IEC, with more than 70% of votes counted.

FS

Figures provided by the IEC, with more than 70% of votes counted.

 

gauteng

Figures provided by the IEC, with more than 70% of votes counted.

kzn

Figures provided by the IEC, with more than 70% of votes counted.

 

 


 

Picture: IEC website

Picture: IEC website

Picture: IEC website

Picture: IEC website

Follow the live update from the IEC below.

With 40% of the vote tallied in Gauteng, the ANC has now pulled ahead in the province, although the DA is still leading two contested metros, Tshwane and Johannesburg.

Picture: IEC website

Picture: IEC website

Provisional results just before 9am this morning showed the DA had a majority win at the polls of the votes counted in Gauteng so far.

Western Cape Premier and former DA leader Helen Zille was “delighted” by the party’s performance in her province so far.

Of particular significance, was that the DA had for the first time taken Cape Agulhas away from the ANC.

Kouga municipality in the Eastern Cape had also been taken and voters’ had increased in the Midvaal area in Gauteng.

“In the Western Cape [there] are spectacular results coming out here and I am very, very excited by it. There’s been a huge swing to the DA and so much for people who keep saying every election we have reached our ceiling.

“So it shows to you that in most places where people have experienced DA government they want more of it; so it’s a wonderful trend that we are seeing here and it is going to continue I think,” Zille said.

Meanwhile, the Electoral Commission was set to update media on the progress of the vote counting process at 11am.

With the ANC leading the national tally of votes counted on Thursday morning, the EFF cautioned that it was still early days.

“We’re looking forward to receiving results that will come much later today because whatever we are seeing on the [IEC live results] boards, even if it’s 45% of the 22 612 voting stations, it however represents a minute fraction of the actual voting population that cast their votes,” EFF secretary-general Godrich Gardee told the African News Agency at the national results operations centre (NROC) in Tshwane.

“What we see there is results from municipalities in the far-flung areas [including] the farms. Some of the municipalities have about 8 000 registered voters and probably about five voting stations. Such municipalities are as big as a voting station like Alexandra [in Gauteng].”

Gardee was optimistic that current trends indicated on the IEC live results boards would change drastically as the day progressed and counting was completed in more municipalities.

“We are gunning for all the 213 municipalities in South Africa. We are gunning for all the nine provinces in South Africa. We are gunning for the power of the State – to capture it and be in power in the municipalities to change the lives of our people. So, for now, let’s chill and relax,” he said.

A weary-looking Gardee said he had been monitoring the results trickling in at the NROC overnight and was now anticipating to be replaced at the elections nerve center on Thursday morning.

“I should be out now. I was taking all the queries coming from the 22 612 voting stations’ party agents who were observing the counting overnight. They were raising queries about the counting process and I had to log it in and you have to know the environment you are working in.”

By 9:50am, 50% of the votes cast in Wednesday’s elections had been counted and displayed at the NROC, representing 11 521 of the 22 612 voting districts. The ANC was still in pole position with 52.19%. The DA was at 29.95% and the EFF trailing at 7.04%. It is the first time the left-wing party has contested local government elections.

Elsewhere, the IEC Gauteng results centre returned to normal on Thursday after presiding officers protested over long hours on duty and having to wait for their results being verified.

They complained that they had worked throughout the night at voting stations and that some had helped out during the casting of special votes, only to be kept waiting at the centre.

“I have a job to go to this morning, I never expected to be kept waiting until the crack of dawn… this is terrible from the IEC,” said one presiding officer.

The provincial election officer, Mashego Shiburi, said the IEC remained thankful to the presiding officers and “understood their frustrations”.

“We understand their frustrations earlier in the morning, they worked in the cold. Processes were in place to assist them to facilitate receiving results, they did so and were able to go home. The situation is normal now, all is left is capturing the results, one municipality has been completed.”

The Democratic Alliance had managed to retain Midvaal municipality, the only municipality controlled by the party in the province. The DA was leading in the province’s early vote tally in Tshwane and Johannesburg ahead of the ANC.

Earlier

Across the Gauteng province, the Democratic Alliance was in the lead with 43.50% (792 973) of the votes with the ANC gaining ground with 42% amounting to 764 179 votes.

While only a smattering of the wards in Tshwane had been counted; the DA was winning with 47.6% to the ANC’s 39.1%. The EFF was trailing with 9% of voters’ support.

In the City of Johannesburg, the DA was also the leading party, with 45% compared to the ANC with 39.8%. The EFF held 9.5%.

In Ekurhuleni, the DA sat at 44.5% of the votes; the ANC 42.3% and the EFF 8%.

Earlier

With more than a third of the votes (40%) counted, the ANC was ahead nationally, but the DA was leading key metros Nelson Mandela Bay, Tshwane, Ekurhuleni and Johannesburg.

The DA already had more than 70% of the Cape Town vote, where it already governs. It has already claimed victory in Midvaal, Gauteng. It also took the Kouga municipality from the ANC in the Eastern Cape. Mayoral candidate Athol Trollip said it seemed clear they had won the municipality convincingly.

Trollip remained confident that the DA would win the Nelson Mandela Bay metro. He said they had probably won nine out of 12 wards in the critical Northern Areas.

By 7am, the DA was leading at the polls with a 5% lead over the ANC in Gauteng.

The majority opposition had a total of 45.82% (640,766 votes) compared with the 40.2% (562,882) in support of the ANC. The EFF trailed with 8.6% of votes counted so far in its favour.

In the Western Cape, the DA looked set to hold on to the majority of the wards in the province. Counting continued through last night and early this morning, and 58% of the 1586 voting districts had been counted.

The DA was streaking ahead with a stronghold of about 64.6% to the ANC’s 24.3%. The EFF came in third with 2.4%.

By 5am, the winners of eight councils had been declared:

Eastern Cape

EC102 Blue Crane Route (ANC)
ANC: 60.43 percent, 7 seats
DA: 37.57 percent, 4 seats
EFF: 2 percent

EC106 Sundays River Valley (ANC)
ANC: 71.36 percent, 11 seats
DA: 21.71 percent, 4 seats
EFF: 5.04 percent, 1 seat

 

Mpumalanga

MP311 Victor Khane (ANC)
ANC: 65.08 percent, 11 seats
DA: 20.85 percent, 4 seats
EFF: 9.99 percent, 2 seats

 

Northern Cape
NCO64 Kamiesberg (ANC)
ANC: 62.52 percent, 4 seats
DA: 28.03 percent, 2 seats
EFF: 7.25 percent, 1 seat

NC0764 Thembelihle (ANC)
ANC: 54.92 percent, 4 seats
DA: 22.85 percent, 2 seats
EFF: 11.47 percent, 1 vote

NC084 !Kheis (ANC)
ANC: 57.23 percent, 4 seats
COPE: 24.29 percent, 2 seats
DA: 9.04 percent, 1 seat

 

Western Cape

WC013 Bergrivier (DA)
DA: 64.08 percent, 9 seats
ANC: 32.68 percent, 4 seats
VF Plus: 1.89 percent

– WC034 Swellendam (DA)
DA: 49.94 percent, 6 seats
ANC: 44.66 percent, 5 seats
VF Plus: 2.06 percent

There was a protest of IEC electoral officers at the results centre in Auckland Park, Johannesburg, in the early morning hours against what they said were unreasonable working hours that had not been clearly communicated to them ahead of the big count. They walked out.

The counting of the results for the 2016 Municipal Elections continued through the night after South Africans voted on Wednesday.

Just before 1.30am on Thursday morning, a bell to announce new results sounded and results of the first completed voting district appeared on the screen at the Electoral Commission of South Africa’s National Results Operation Centre in Pretoria.

It showed that NC064 – Kamiesberg at 100 percent as all 16 of the 16 voting districts had been counted. The African National Congress had taken control of its first council.

It was still early for results to be a true reflection of the elections as only one council was completed out of 213, but by 1.50am the ANC had 51 percent of the national votes counted, the Democratic Alliance had 34.64 percent and the Economic Freedom Fighters had 5.42 percent.

The Inkatha Freedom Party had 2.47 percent, the Freedom Front Plus had 1.41 percent and Other Parties had 2.1 percent.

Political party representatives, IEC officials and journalists sat around chatting and continuously checking the results as the numbers changed slightly every few minutes.

“This is going to take forever but will be interesting,” one party representative said.

The IEC announced the first results on Wednesday night, just before 9pm.

“We have reached the moment that we have all looked forward to and it is a moment of pride for us as a nation,” Independent Electoral Commission SA (IEC) Chairperson Glen Mashinini said, briefing the media and political parties at the results centre in Pretoria.

With three large screens erected on the wall behind the podium, the results went up. One screen showed fireworks as the main screen in the centre showed the results of Ward 6 of EC123 in the Great Kei, Eastern Cape.

From the information on the screen it showed 22 people voted. The DA received 10 votes, the ANC seven and an independent candidate received five votes.

Mashinini said these were the first audited results from the Local Government elections.

Cheers came from the DA as the results indicated they had secured 45.45 percent and the ANC 31.82 percent.

Earlier, IEC spokesperson Kate Bapela said they still expected “many, many results” to come in throughout the night.

She said the results would come in slowly but that the final results would only be ready on Saturday.

– African News Agency (ANA)

Earlier

Politicians from various parties were sitting around and chatting on Wednesday night at the Electoral Commission of South Africa’s (IEC) national results centre, waiting for the results in the 2016 municipal elections.

ANC secretary-general Gwede Mantashe went to shake the hands of DA national spokesperson Phumzile Van Damme and federal executive chairperson James Selfe after the first results were announced.

DA Leader Mmusi Maimane arrived at around 9.20pm.

Sitting at the Economic Freedom Fighters’ desk waiting for results were national spokesperson Mbuyiseni Ndlozi, secretary-general Godrich Gardee and chairperson Dali Mpofu.

The IEC announced the first results on Wednesday night, just before 9pm.

“We have reached the moment that we have all looked forward to and it is a moment of pride for us as a nation,” said Independent Electoral Commission of SA (IEC) chairperson Glen Mashinini, briefing the media and political parties at the results centre in Pretoria.

With three large screens erected on the wall behind the podium, the results went up. One screen showed fireworks as the main screen in the centre showed the results of Ward 6 of EC123 in the Great Kei, Eastern Cape.

From the information on the screen it showed 22 people voted. The Democratic Alliance (DA) received 10 votes, the African National Congress (ANC) seven and an independent candidate received five votes.

Mashinini said these were the first audited results from the local government elections.

Cheers came from the DA as the results indicated they had secured 45.45 percent and the African National Congress 31.82 percent.

IEC spokesperson Kate Bapela said they still expected “many, many results” to come in throughout the night.

As the results trickled in, politicians were doing media interviews as journalists discussed the results.

Other politicians at the centre on Wednesday evening included the ANC’s Jackson Mthembu, the ANC’s Jesse Duarte and Congress of the People leader Mosiuoa “Terror” Lekota.

– African News Agency (ANA)

Earlier

With a decent voter turnout, but isolated incidents of unrest, the suspense of Wednesday’s local government elections was going to lie in its predicted photo-finish results in the country’s big metros.

As polls closed at 7pm, political party insiders were not willing to call these, echoing pollsters and analysts’ observations in the run-up to the poll that the ANC and DA were locked in a bitterly close race for control of Nelson Mandela Bay, Tshwane and Johannesburg.

“It is so nail-bitingly close that I really would not like to say,” a senior Democratic Alliance official said of the battle for Port Elizabeth, before issuing the same disclaimer for Tshwane.

After a bloody campaign for the capital, voting here proceeded smoothly on Wednesday and the mayoral candidate whose imposition sparked the pre-poll violence, Thoko Didiza, smilingly predicted that the ANC would hold on to power in Pretoria.

Casting his ballot in Cape Town, Deputy Public Works Minister Jeremy Cronin gave a characteristically honest assessment of the state of the ruling party, saying it would shed some support and find cause for soul-searching after the biggest elections, by virtue of its 26 million registered voters, in South African history.

“I think its obvious the ANC is undergoing a series of challenges that I think have to do with 22 years in incumbency, which brings its challenges, which the DA has discovered here in Cape Town,” Cronin told the African News Agency.

He said the big battles would be around the metros, “particularly the metros in Gauteng and Nelson Mandela Bay”, and that, once the ballots were counted, a “great deal of soul searching would need to happen within the party”.

The impact of Wednesday’s voter turnout — which was estimated at between 50 and 60 percent by the time polls closed — would depend in large part on where voters had come out in numbers. Big numbers casting their ballots in rural areas would boost the ANC’s performance, whereas the DA would profit from a higher turnout in the metropolitain areas.

By 7pm, no credible breakdown was available.

With the Economic Freedomn Fighters (EFF) forecast to take below 10% in the three most tightly contested cities, the eternal election riddle remained whether the DA, and in particular under its first black leader Mmusi Maimane, had managed to lure black voters away from the movement-turned-ruling party that enfranchised the country’s majority.

Maimane’s predecessor Helen Zille found an elegant answer to what had been deemed a not-pretty attempt on Maimane’s part to turn Nelson Mandela, the Nobel peace laureate and ANC icon, into a poster boy for the official opposition.

“Madiba belongs to all South Africans, just as George Washington belongs to all Americans,” she told reporters before voting in Rosebank in Cape Town, adding that she thought the DA had never run a better or more “intense campaign”.

Voting went off quietly in Cape Town, where the DA has always looked set for another home run, and the worst tension of the day played itself out in Vuwani, the Limpopo township marked by violent protests over its re-demarcation.

The IEC was forced to set up tents as alternative voting venues after protesters had blocked roads and locked IEC officials out of designated polling stations.

– African News Agency (ANA)

Earlier

As the 2016 local government elections kicked off on Wednesday, with citizens milling to the polls countrywide, the Independent Electoral Commission’s results operations centre in Pretoria also began its duties.

The centre – located at the Tshwane Events Centre – gleamed with the IEC’s signature blue colours, as media and officials trickled in, waiting for the first set of results to appear on big screens.

According to the IEC, the majority of the country’s 22 612 voting stations reported being open on time at 7am, reportedly with strong turnouts.

“The electoral commission is also very pleased to report that the situation was reported as calm and voting was under way in areas identified as potential hotspots in the run-up to the elections including Vuwani, Limpopo, Emfuleni. and Midvaal in Gauteng, and Umzimkhulu in KwaZulu-Natal,” said IEC chairperson Glen Mashinini.

But there were isolated reports of unrest and community protests that affected the start of voting in certain wards in the Eastern Cape, including some voting districts in Ward 16 in Ntabankulu and voting districts in Ward 8 in Amathole, he revealed.

“Security forces have been deployed to ensure that voting could start as soon as possible.”

Other hiccups included tents being blown over by high winds overnight in Qwa-Qwa, Free State, and Nelson Mandela Bay, Eastern Cape, and the late arrival of election staff and voting materials at some stations.

There were also four motor vehicle accidents involving election staff, with fortunately no serious injuries. In Strydenberg in the Northern Cape, a voter sadly died at the voting station. “Police on scene were dealing with the incident.”

According to IEC officials on the ground, his death appeared to be of natural causes, but this could not yet be confirmed.

IEC warns employers 

Employers could land themselves in hot water for not allowing an employee to vote during Wednesday’s local government elections, as it is illegal to do so.

The IEC once again reminded employees that election day had been a declared a public holiday, affording South African citizens the opportunity to vote.

“The electoral commission would also like to remind all employers – especially those in the agriculture, retail, transport, mining and other sectors which operate continuously – that today has been declared a public holiday to allow all South Africans the opportunity to vote,” IEC chairperson Glen Mashinini said at the IEC’s results operation centre in Pretoria.

“It is illegal to prevent any voter from exercising their right to vote.”

IEC chief electoral officer Mosotho Moepya reiterated this message to farmers, who, it is said, are sometimes not allowed to vote.

“… Election day has been declared a public holiday… to free persons who could not otherwise be in a spot to do so [vote].

“It was made clear in the media.”

Moepya added that arrangements to allow an employee to vote could also be made between colleagues.

He also pointed to a special vote that was conducted on Tuesday.

According to the constitution, “every citizen shall have the right to vote, to do so in secret and to stand for election to public office”.

 

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