National 26.7.2016 09:01 pm

Flooding shuts down Durban beaches

Umdloti North Beach Road Photo: Northcoast Courier

Umdloti North Beach Road Photo: Northcoast Courier

The municipality said many residents faced the possibility of having their homes flooded as water levels rose.

eThekwini Municipality on Tuesday said it was monitoring water levels as inclement weather in the province caused flash flooding, leaving many residents having their homes flooded.

This comes as the municipality also urgently closed down north and south beaches in Durban due to high seas and storm damage.

“The eThekwini Municipality Disaster Management team is monitoring water levels in the rivers and streams, following heavy rains that started on Sunday, causing flooding to homes and roads around the City,” the municipality said in a statement.

It was reported that the coastal district was most affected and it was still raining in the south coast on Tuesday morning.

But the municipality said KwaMashu township, north of Durban, was also one of the most affected areas.

The municipality said many residents faced the possibility of having their homes flooded as water levels rose.

“The most affected area is KwaMashu, where houses have been flooded, and people have been accommodated in the local hall.”

Some roads were in the city, especially Blamet, Blamey and South Coast Roads, were completely flooded, making it difficult for motorists to use.

“While we are grateful for the rains, we encourage motorists to be extra cautious in Durban today, drive slower and switch on your lights,” the municipality said.

Meanwhile, KZN Emergency Medical Services spokesperson Robert McKenzie said emergency services were on high alert during the night and that disaster management teams were activated in the districts to remove people from low-lying flood areas.

McKenzie said many of these people were taken to shelters overnight.

The SA Weather Service has predicted that rains would continue until the end of Tuesday.

– African News Agency (ANA)

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