National 26.7.2016 12:05 pm

Terror-accused Thulsie twins’ bail application delayed

Wasiela Thulsie (centre) with her daughter Sumaya Lackay (left). Picture: Neil McCartney

Wasiela Thulsie (centre) with her daughter Sumaya Lackay (left). Picture: Neil McCartney

The Thulsie twins are facing charges including conspiracy and incitement to commit the crime of terrorism.

The bail application of alleged terrorist twins Brandon-Lee and Tony-Lee Thulsie was delayed on Tuesday due to technical difficulties in printing the twins’ affidavits.

Advocate Anneline van den Heever told the Johannesburg Magistrates’ Court that she was still waiting for the documents to arrive.

The Thulsie twins, who were arrested two weeks ago, are accused of plotting a terror attack in which they allegedly planned to detonate explosions at the US Mission in South Africa and at Jewish institutions in the country.

Although State prosecutor Chris MacAdam told the court that matter could proceed, Magistrate Pieter du Plessis wanted the twins to consult with their lawyer and decide if they wanted to proceed with the bail application.

Du Plessis told the twins that their offences fell under schedule six, a category of serious crimes that included premeditated murder. He said the evidence they brought forward in their affidavits had implications for the case that could affect the outcome of the trial.

The Thulsie twins are facing charges of conspiracy and incitement to commit the crime of terrorism, and conspiring and attempting to commit acts associated with terrorist activities.

Van Den Heever approached the twins before telling the court that they intended to proceed with the bail application.

She told the court the affidavits would be available “shortly” and requested that Du Plessis read them in his chambers in order to save time as they were very lengthy.

However, the magistrate told Van Den Heever that he never read affidavits “in private” to avoid any conspiracy allegations.

Court briefly adjourned.

– African News Agency (ANA)

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